I will think long and hard before buying used bladed tools. No matter how good they look in the photo, the blades always need a lot of work. Lot of time. Lot of wear on the diamond plate, waterstones, and sandpaper. My whole body is sore. I’m not sure I came out ahead. The results? Hit and miss. More work still needed. But not today. Happy Labor Day weekend :)

I will think long and hard before buying used bladed tools. No matter how good they look in the photo, the blades always need a lot of work. Lot of time. Lot of wear on the diamond plate, waterstones, and sandpaper. My whole body is sore. I’m not sure I came out ahead. The results? Hit and miss. More work still needed. But not today. Happy Labor Day weekend :)

Haul from the farmers market. Fruitless sharpening. Park with wind and sun.

This is my homescreen

I think the sheer pace of distractions in modern life (most clearly exemplified by smart phones and email) is the greatest risk to our sanity and wisdom as individuals and a species. A hyperbole for effect? Perhaps.

Below is my latest attempt at controlling my own human weaknesses by making all of the non-urgent apps (that includes email!) on my iPhone as difficult to get to as possible. I had previously tried deleting almost everything on my phone, but that didn’t last—I am only human.

Perhaps this a realistic compromise for me in the right direction. I am already spending less time mindlessly checking apps for updates. If you’re curious, try it and let me know if it does anything for you.

image

A nice overview of restoring an old kanna blade. Although I wish I knew what the liquids were that he was using to lacquer (?) the blade with.

(Source: youtube.com)

When your city is covered in fog, only place to go is up.

When your city is covered in fog, only place to go is up.

Tags: mttam

…on Draw by Agreement

"In tournament games, it is customary to forbid a draw by agreement before a thirtieth move. This stipulation is aimed at players who may find themselves in too peaceful a mood for the kind of fight that chess requires." - Chess for Beginners by I. A. Horowitz.

Tags: chess

A merciless battle of half wits ensues. .

A merciless battle of half wits ensues. .

japaneseaesthetics:

Water Pitcher.  Wood; lacquerwork.  Early 19th century, Japan.    NationalMuseum of Ethnology, Leiden, the Netherlands .  The extreme simplicity of this pitcher, with, as seen above, hardly any specific treatment nor any adornment, results in something which even today strikes us as a perfect design. Seemingly not misplaced in some exhibition of contemporary Scandinavian design, yet, it dates back from the early decades of the nineteenth century. It is, I would say, that even today, impossible to improve on this red-lacquered water pitcher. The manufacturing and execution are built on a tradition of several centuries: the basic shape consists in a plywood structure to which a wooden handle and spout are attached. This construction is then covered with many layers of lacquer, made from the sap of the lacquer tree, the Rhus vernicifera. Adding green vitriol or acetous ferric oxide to the purified lacquer produces the common black, applied to the inside of the pitcher. The red lacquer used on the outside derives from adding cinnabar or, more likely in this case, colcothar, benigara. In both the black and the red, the lustre of it depends on the quality of the purified raw lacquer.  Text by Prof. Matthi Forrer, curator Japanese arts, Leiden.

japaneseaesthetics:

Water Pitcher.  Wood; lacquerwork.  Early 19th century, Japan.    NationalMuseum of Ethnology, Leiden, the Netherlands .  The extreme simplicity of this pitcher, with, as seen above, hardly any specific treatment nor any adornment, results in something which even today strikes us as a perfect design. Seemingly not misplaced in some exhibition of contemporary Scandinavian design, yet, it dates back from the early decades of the nineteenth century. It is, I would say, that even today, impossible to improve on this red-lacquered water pitcher. The manufacturing and execution are built on a tradition of several centuries: the basic shape consists in a plywood structure to which a wooden handle and spout are attached. This construction is then covered with many layers of lacquer, made from the sap of the lacquer tree, the Rhus vernicifera. Adding green vitriol or acetous ferric oxide to the purified lacquer produces the common black, applied to the inside of the pitcher. The red lacquer used on the outside derives from adding cinnabar or, more likely in this case, colcothar, benigara. In both the black and the red, the lustre of it depends on the quality of the purified raw lacquer.  Text by Prof. Matthi Forrer, curator Japanese arts, Leiden.

(Source: masterpieces.asemus.museum, via tetsuichi)

Alishan, Taiwan. Giant red cypress trees, some over 2,000 years old.